Top 35 Best Keyboard Pianos of 2019 Reviews

Are you on the market looking for quality keyboard pianos? We’re reviewing some of the best in various categories, including best overall, beginner, budget, portable, with weighted keys, with 88 keys, and best USB piano keyboards, so whatever you’re looking for, it’s bound to be in one of our lists.

Just a quick note before we begin, although we will deal with this issue in the buying guide, note that we’re reviewing keyboards, not digital pianos. There’s a subtle difference between the two, which mainly revolves around the intended use for the instrument. Namely, keyboards are more versatile while pianos strive to provide authentic, acoustic-like sounds. If you are looking for digital pianos, don’t worry. We have a dedicated article you can check out here to help you find one.


Here Are the Top 14 Best Keyboard Pianos of 2019:

Model Name

Category

Sound Quality

Versatility

Price

Best Keyboard Piano

Unparalleled

Huge

$$$$$

Best Beginner Piano Keyboard

High

Very high

$$

Best Beginner Piano Keyboard

High

Very high

$$

Best Budget Keyboard Piano

High

Beyond average

$$$

Best Budget Keyboard Piano

Beyond average

Beyond average

$$$

Best Portable Keyboard Piano

Very high

High

$$

Best Portable Keyboard Piano

High

Beyond average

$

Best Weighted Keyboard Piano

Exceptional

Exceptional

$$$

Best 88 Key Keyboard Piano

Beyond average

High

$$$$

Best 88 Key Keyboard Piano

Beyond average

High

$$$

Best USB Piano Keyboard

High

Beyond average

$$


Best Keyboard Pianos

We’re opening up our review of the best keyboard pianos with one of Korg’s finest keyboard models – the PA4X. Essentially, this is the best you’ll find for the buck, although it does cost quite a bit, being one of the most expensive keys in the boutique price point category.

First and foremost, there are so many features onboard that it’s pretty hard to find the starting ground to begin with. The keys are semi weighted, having a characteristic sensitivity and a phenomenal aftertouch, the cabinet is streamlined and made of highly durable aluminium materials, and one of the best things about it is the capactivie display supplied with a tilting system.

There are more than 1500 sounds for you to enjoy in, all of which are powered by the Enhanced Definition Synthesis sound engine. Most people point out that what they like best about Korg’s PA4X is the authenticity of the voicings.

What’s more, there are more than 140 effect types, as well as the Helicon processing integrated into the software.

As good as it is, there are a couple of things that could’ve been done a bit better, such as the number of keys, for example, as it comes with 61 only. On top of that, it’s fairly expensive, and it’s quite safe to say that it’s practically reserved for professional piano players.

Pros:

  • An impressive number of sounds and effects
  • Premium quality sound engine
  • Realistic sounds
  • Durable construction
  • Huge value for the money

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Only 61 keys

Right after Korg’s PA4X we’re moving on to Roland’s FP 90 – a beautiful, highly versatile digital keyboard. Even though it costs only half as much as our previous pick, it’s still in the same price range and costs quite a lot.

It packs 88 fully weighted keys, hybrid PHA 50 plastic (a mix of wood and plastic), and fully adjustable touch sensitivity. Furthermore, it sounds incredibly real due to the SuperNatural modelling sound engine.

It also features 350 sound effects taken from 15 grand pianos, but if that doesn’t seems enough, there’s also the piano designer features that allows you to further customize your experience with hammer noise, string resonance, cabinet resonance, damper noise, and duplex scale options.

There are two 25W speakers onboard, which means that it sounds like a house, even on the lower volume settings. Overall, the biggest advantages of this keyboard piano is that it provides real-like sound effects (and a lot of them), it looks sleek and elegant, and there are plenty of room for sound customization if you’re up for it.

Pros:

  • 350 instrument voices taken from 15 grand pianos
  • Super Natural piano modelling sound engine
  • Piano designer feature for superior sound customization
  • Hybrid action and fully weighted keys

Cons

  • Not exactly easy to use

We’re looking at Yamaha’s MOXF8, which is basically a complete keyboard piano bundle, including a padded bench, a stand, and a padded bag with wheels. If you’re looking for a highly versatile keyboard piano for live performances, this might be exactly what you need.

First of all, there are 88 keys onboard – they’re all complemented with the GHS action, although 61 of them have a semi weighted action (selectable option).

It comes supplied with the AWM2 engine and has over a thousand available tones with Virtual Circuit modelling engine, which is basically as much versatility as anybody needs. There’s a plethora of features at your disposal, and even though this might not be the most user friendly keyboard, in good hands it could make quite a mayhem.

All things considered, this is a professional keyboard piano, and it just so happens that it’s one of the more affordable options from Yamaha in this field. The brand that made it is one of the most reliable ones on the market, the workstation offers as much versatility as you need, and the voices are so diverse that MOXF8 will sound great in practically any setting, be it a studio, live gig, or for home practice.

Pros:

  • Superb versatility
  • All kinds of sounds and voices
  • Complementary features
  • Perfect for both studio work and live performances
  • Outstanding action

Cons

  • Not the most user friendly keyboard available

Casio makes some of the finest digital pianos out there, and the first model from them in this review is PX 560 BE. Essentially, this is a smaller bundle which is comprised of the SP20 piano sustain pedal and the adjustable Z-style stand.

This keyboard has 550 tone styles and samples taken from numerous instruments, including guitars, strings, and more. It’s about as versatile as every other digital keyboard we’ve covered thus far.

Apart from being versatile and having so many sounds, it’s also USB compatible (PC, Mac, iOS devices, you don’t need to install any kind of drivers).

In a nutshell, this piano has a set of very realistic voices, its construction is durable, and the sustainer pedal it comes outfitted with helps simulate the sustain real grand pianos can with acoustic piano pedals. It’s not overly expensive, and it’s surely more than just worth the buck.

Pros:

  • Comes outfitted with a sustain pedal and a Z-style stand
  • Over 550 voices and tone effects
  • USB recording capability
  • Numerous useful modes

Cons

  • Factory piano voices aren’t as authentic 

We’re closing down this section with Roland’s FP 10 BK digital piano bundle – it features a Z-style bench, a comfortable stool, a sustainer pedal, and Behringer’s HPS3000 studio headphones. Best of all, this premium-quality bundle costs several times less in comparison to the models we’ve reviewed so far.

In essence Roland’s pianos almost by default have rich tones, and this one’s powered by the Super Natural sound engine. The keys have a strong hammer action and are complemented by the PHA-4 tech for the most authentic touch and play-ability possible.

There are several modes for you to enjoy, as well as the built in Bluetooth USB interface, so connectivity is great as well. Punchline – it made it to NAMM, so there’s no question about its value.

Pros:

  • Great action and playability
  • Comes laden with gratis goodies
  • Authentic sounds
  • Awesome action

Cons

  • Low versatility

Best Beginner Piano Keyboard

Here’s the first beginner piano keyboard that we’re recommending to you – ADM might not be among the most famous brands out there, but they’re offering a wide selection of quality instruments available at a cheap price, so if you’re down on cash, browse away.

This particular piano model is basically a smaller version of the giants we’ve just reviewed. Instead of having hundreds and thousands of sounds and voices, there are only 100 sound effects onboard. That’s neither too much or too little, and what’s really good about it is the fact that you’ll actually get the chance to memorize them in several weeks.

One of the main reasons why we’ve dubbed this piano as one of the best for beginners is because the whole feature setup is quite user friendly. The modes are quite easy to figure out, there are 61 keys (as opposed to full 88), the LCD screen is quite useful for monitoring of what effect is currently active, and there are several bonus features including headphones, a microphone, and a carry bag you’ll get completely free of charge.

Pros:

  • User friendly features
  • 100 keyboard effect sounds
  • Comes with gratis features
  • Very easy to use

Cons

  • The speakers aren’t too loud

Here we have another great beginner bundle. Moukey’s MEK 200 digital keyboard piano comes supplied with a Z styled stand, a keyboard stool, a microphone, and the power supply adapter – basically all you need to start playing, recording, and pretty much whatever you want to do musically.

This piano has 61 non-weighted keys that feel rather soft. This is perfect for beginner players who are yet to get accustomed to how real pianos should feel (although the action is strikingly different from playing a real acoustic piano).

Now, as for the reason why we included this piano in our ‘beginner’ section of the review, it has over 100 piano sounds, the same number of rhythms, and some 50 demonstration songs aiming to help you learn the ropes.

Pros:

  • 100 rhythms and piano sounds
  • Comes with a Z styled stand, a keyboard stool, a microphone, and a power supply adapter
  • Numerous demonstration songs
  • Great action for beginners

Cons

  • Some of the accessories are rather cheap in quality

Next up is Joy’s KL 91M digital piano. In terms of aesthetics and features, it vaguely resembles our previous two picks, although it’s fair to say that it’s even more versatile in that respect. It has 61 keys, some of which have the lightning function which will most definitely help you figure out where to put which finger when playing songs.

Now, as for the part where we mentioned that KL 91M is more versatile than your average beginner’s keyboard piano, it includes over 255 rhythms and timbres atop 50 demo songs. Among the selectable mode, there are transpose, fill in, metronome, sync, single chord, chord timbre, fingered chord, rhythm programming, record, and sustain.

It’s a great beginner pack which comes supplied with virtually everything you need, including a durable stand, a set of headphones, a music stool, and a DC adaptor.

The only bad thing is that it’s made of relatively cheap plastic materials, but other than that it’s perfect for beginners.

Pros:

  • A bundle comprised of a keyboard stand, set of headphones, a music stool, and a DC adaptor
  • Over 225 rhythms and timbres, as well as 50 demo songs
  • Multiple patterns and functions (modes)
  • Decent action and sound

Cons

  • Cheap plastic build

Essentially, Best Choice Products’ digital piano keyboard was specifically setup to help beginners handle the part of starting out as a piano player. It features 61 full size keys, 255 timbres, 50 demonstration songs, as well as eight types of percussion effects.

Among the beginner oriented features, there’s also the lightning function to the keys and rec & playback function. To top it all, there are three teaching modes that will undoubtedly get you started, including one key, follow, and the ensemble mode.

What else is different about this keyboard is that it comes with a H style keyboard stand that packs non skid rubber feet, a padded stool (which is completely adjustable), a pair of headphones, and a DC adaptor.

Basically, both the teaching modes and the complementary features are perhaps a bit better in comparison to other models we’ve reviewed so far, but there are a couple of things that could’ve been done slightly better. For instance, the keys feel very flimsy. Other than that, Best Choice Products’ beginner’s piano keyboard holds quite a value for the money.

Pros:

  • Outstanding gratis features
  • Beginner learning modes
  • 50 Demonstration songs and 255 timbres & rhythms
  • Light up keys and playback

Cons

  • Keys feel flimsy 

The last beginner keyboard piano we’re recommending is RockJam’s 54-key electronic keyboard. Basically, there are a lot of reasons why this model might just be everything you need.

First of all, it’s the cheapest of the five piano keyboards in this segment of the review. Secondly, it has only 54 keys, which means that, in terms of hand-eye coordination, it’s a bit easier to use than 61-key models.

Furthermore, there’s only 100 sound voices and rhythms. That’s a good thing if you’re a beginner since it will be easier for you to memorize the ones you like best. The LCD screen is fully interactive and aims to show you the notes you should be playing at times (just like an interactive music sheet book).

You can get free demonstration songs via the Piano Maestro application – it’s a plus since the option is available, sort of, but it’s a minus because most beginner keyboards already have demo songs onboard. Overall, it’s great for the money.

Pros:

  • 100 sound voices and rhythms
  • 30 downloadable songs via Piano Maestro application
  • Rec and playback
  • 54 keys
  • Interactive LCD display

Cons

  • Only 8 songs are available prior to downloading 

Best Budget Keyboard Pianos

Though certainly not the most affordable keyboard piano on the market, Roland’s GO Educational bundle is one of the best high-value keyboard packs out there. It passed all the criteria for the ‘best beginner piano keyboard’ category as well, but since Roland seldom offers models at such a low price, we thought that its place should be in this segment of the review.

First of all, the GO:Piano is quite compact and has a space saving footprint. It’s lightweight and with only 61 keys it can easily be stored wherever, whenever.

There are over 100 different piano and organ sounds, but what makes the GO Piano one of the best budget piano keyboards is that it packs Bluetooth connectivity. Pair it up with your smart phone and there’s no limit to what you can do with it, again, whenever.

The LCD display is decently big and it will show you which sound effect is active, as well as its representative number. Though not exceptionally versatile, this keyboard does a great bang for the buck.

Pros:

  • Compact and lightweight design
  • Bluetooth and MIDI support
  • Great sound
  • Easy maintenance

Cons

  • Low versatility

Casio’s pianos and keys are among the best in the budget and mid-priced price point categories, and here we are looking at an amazing keyboard model with plenty of versatility – the LK 280 digital keyboard piano.

Essentially, this is a 61-key touch response piano that packs a large LCD display, a USB port, SD standalone card storage, and a plain headphone output. There are some 600 built in tone effects and voices and 180 rhythm and accompaniment patterns. What’s more, it also has a built in step up lesson system which makes it pretty awesome for beginners.

It sounds pretty great, but the one thing that’s not so good about it is the fact that it’s bulky, hence the maintenance process won’t be as easy. Regardless, it brings quite a lot to the table and it’s most definitely among the best budget keyboard models on the market.

Pros:

  • 600 built in tones
  • 180 rhythm and accompaniment patterns
  • SD standalone card storage
  • 6-track recorder
  • Large display

Cons

  • Bulky and somewhat heavier than average

In essence, Hamzer is not a huge brand, but their electronic digital piano is pretty formidable in comparison to similarly priced keyboards. Actually, it’s a beginner piano that offers just about enough versatility to pass on for a good budget model.

Speaking of versatility, it features 255 timbres and rhythms, over 60 keyboard percussions, and, as for the reason why it’s so good for beginners, it also has 24 demo songs. Furthermore, it has a built in learning system – it was specifically designed to provide the know-how for beginners and intermediate level players.

There aren’t too many features, and it’s really great that they’re all very easy to use. The display is fairly big and easy to read, and the sound effects are basically printed on the keyboard so you don’t have to memorize them all. Recording and playback capabilities are also included.

Pros:

  • Superb for beginners
  • Very easy to use
  • Great sound for the money
  • Easy setup

Cons

  • Though it was meant for both beginners and intermediate level players, pianists who are just starting out would benefit more from using it

Hutington is one of those brands that have something for everyone. From window blinds, over drone spoons, over propane gas grills, to musical instruments. Though they’re not a specialized music manufacturing online shop, they have quite a few really cool piano keyboards, so we’ve decided to give KB61 a shot.

First of all, this keyboard is moderately versatile, featuring 100 voices and rhythms at sixteen volume levels. It’s pretty great for beginners since it comes with eight demo songs and thirty two tempo settings (great for practicing rhythm).

There are several modes to choose from, including single-chord function, finger-chord function, transpose, sync, fill-in, sustain, and, of course, vibrato. It packs 61 standard size piano keys and has a pair of fairly strong built in speakers.

In a nutshell, this digital piano keyboard offers a little bit of everything. There are just about enough voices, a couple of beginner friendly features, a big display, and an easy to use configuration panel. It’s cheap, but fairly great performance wise.

Pros:

  • Over 100 rhythms and voices
  • Sixteen volume levels
  • Great for beginners
  • Multiple playing modes
  • Strong speakers

Cons

  • Doesn’t excel in virtually any field of performance
  • Mediocre sound quality

We’re closing down this section of the review with Lagrima’s Electric piano keyboard. Basically, this is the cheapest keyboard you could find that actually sounds pretty good and has an acceptable level of versatility.

It has 61 keys and a not-exactly-lifelike action, but it’s pretty good for people who’ve never played piano before. It features some 128 timbres and rhythms, eight percussions, and twelve demo songs. This particular bundle also comes with a gratis microphone, although other options include a X-style stand and a carry bag (cost a bit more too, though).

Sound wise, this keyboard is all but organic, and like we’ve mentioned, its forte appear to be cheapness and therefore, value for the money. It’s decently versatile and, even though the keyboard is not robust per se, with proper maintenance and care it will last for a decade, to say the very least.

Pros:

  • Among the cheapest decent keyboards on the market
  • Quite versatile with 128 timbres and rhythms
  • Great for beginners
  • Several modes, including the recording option

Cons

  • Overly bright, non-organic sound

Best Portable Keyboard Pianos

Yamaha might just be the biggest piano manufacturer out there, not to mention the longest-standing brand in the industry altogether. They mainly focus on delivering high-performance pianos, keyboards and workstations, and YPT260 is one of their cheapest portable models.

In regard to its versatility, the YPT260 has 400 piano voices and 130 auto-accompaniment styles. Furthermore, it works like a charm for beginners since it has over a hundred demonstration songs onboard, not to mention the Yamaha’s exclusive education suite along with a nine step lesson feature.

It has both record and playback features and its connectivity is pretty high, being capable to connect to any form of smart phone, tablet, and PC.

The only bad thing about it is that it doesn’t really sound authentic, which means that the voices are, perhaps, a bit overly digitalized. Nevertheless, it’s cheap, it comes from a very reliable brand, and it’s very portable due to its remarkably small footprint.

Pros:

  • Superb versatility and portability 
  • Great for beginners
  • Over 400 voices and auto-accompaniment styles
  • Educational suite and 9 step lesson feature
  • Record ready 

Cons

  • Digitalized, non-authentic sonds

GreenPro’s digital piano offers a fine balance between affordability and performance. This is actually a mini bundle that features a gratis fully adjustable stand which comes as a bonus feature.

Performance wise, this keyboard piano delivers a decently good sound. There are 300 timbres and rhythms for you to choose from, and the piano-based voices are decently authentic, resembling those of acoustic grand pianos.

In terms of versatility, apart from the plethora of sounds and voices this piano also packs three teaching modes and 60 demonstrational songs, making it a good option for beginners as well.

Connectivity wise, it features a microphone, headphone, USB, and a power line port. In a nutshell, it’s cheap, portable, and does the job for the buck.

Pros:

  • Very versatile keyboard piano
  • Cheap and portable
  • Comes with a gratis fully adjustable stand
  • Heavy-duty steel construction
  • Record-ready piano

Cons

  • Some people point out that this keyboard is too loud 

We’ve seen a couple of Casio models in previous sections of the review, and now we’re taking a gander at their SA76. Basically, this is the first mini-sized keyboard that actually sounds pretty much like a regular keyboard despite its small size.

Apart from being the smallest in size, this is also the first piano that has only 44 keys. That means that it leaves a remarkably small footprint, so it’s more than safe to say that it won’t take up any significant space at your home. It’s quite obvious that it’s compact as well.

Performance wise, the SA76 packs 100 timbres and fifty rhythm styles. Choosing the tones is all too easy since the front panel is exceptionally user friendly. There’s also a relatively big LC display onboard, which further simplifies the method of operation of Casio’s SA76.

The only bad thing about it is the volume slider, since you’ll have to put some extra effort at times to make it work.

In conclusion, Casio’s SA76 is a very basic keyboard. It’s very portable, lightweight, it sounds nice, and it’s decently versatile. A hiccup here and there, but it generally does the job for the price.

Pros:

  • Miniature keyboard with excellent portability
  • Over 100 sound effects and rhythm patterns
  • Big easy to read LCD screen
  • Fairly authentic sounds

Cons

  • Low quality volume slider

Wenini’s a small time brand dealing with various products, but it just so happens that they’re selling a very portable keyboard piano called MQ 6106. It has 61 keys, and though it’s not exceptionally versatile with 16 timbres and 10 rhythm styles, it’s got a powerful set of speakers and some pretty authentic voices.

There’s quite a lot of sliders and functions, but they are organized in a very simple fashion, making them easy to both use and memorize.

Though this is not a beginner’s keyboard piano per se, there are six demonstration songs and several percussion recordings that could potentially help you figure out the basics. Some of the best things this remarkable little piano offers are portability and affordability, although virtually every other sphere of performance leaves plenty of room for improvement. Overall, for a cheap and compact piano, the MQ 6106 does the job as intended.

Pros:

  • Strong speakers
  • Decently authentic sound for a cheap keyboard
  • Several beginner friendly features
  • 61 keys with moderate pressure sensitivity

Cons

  • Only 16 timbres and 10 rhythm styles

The last compact piano in our review is actually more of an honourable mention. It’s Kawai’s ES110 – a slightly more expensive option in comparison to our previous picks in this category, but there’s certainly a lot of things you’ll love about it that makes up for the high price.

First of all, the ES110 is relatively basic. It comes supplied with only 19 voices, but you’d be amazed at how real and authentic the timbres are. Furthermore, it’s surprisingly light, weighing only 26 pounds (without any accessories, that is).

Another great thing Kawai ES110 brings to the table is the superb speaker system. The speakers are very powerful and deliver a robust sound at all times. Furthermore, the ES110 features Bluetooth connectivity, so you’re set to go if you’re looking for a live performance keyboard that won’t provide you with too many troubles in terms of logistics.

The only real bad thing about it is that it costs quite a lot. Nevertheless, with pure sounds and an incredibly easy to use approach, it goes beyond all doubt that ES110 is well worth the cash.

Pros:

  • Lightweight and portable
  • Superb speaker system
  • Bluetooth connectivity
  • Very easy to use

Cons

  • Expensive
  • No screen or display

Best Weighted Keyboard Pianos

Let’s open up our ‘best weighted keyboard piano’ section with The One’s Smart keyboard pro. Essentially, what interests us the most here is the fact that the keys of this piano keyboard have a hammer action touch-response keys. In short, the action is pretty similar to that of an acoustic grand piano.

As for the other features, it’s really amazing that this piano is capable of delivering 128-note polyphony audio, which basically means that the sounds and voices are as authentic as possible.

It’s somewhat surprising that the keys also have the lightning function, since this is most definitely not a beginner piano keyboard per se, but it seems that it could be, if need be. To top it all, the playing modes include light up sheet music, built in video lessons, a Crash course feature, and several piano games.

Pros:

  • Could be a perfect piano for beginners
  • Hammer action with fully adjustable touch-response
  • Light up functions and numerous educational modes
  • Exceptionally authentic sound and piano voices

Cons

  • Quite expensive 
  • Limited versatility

It’s time to see what LK190 can do – after Privia (and right before CTK 3500), it’s safe to say that this particular model has a lot of proving to do.

Let’s start from the very beginning. Performance wise, this is a formidable piano – it has a pair of fairly strong speakers, some 60 integrated songs, 400 timbres and 100 rhythms. Formidable and versatile would be the words that would best describe its performance.

Now, sonically, LK190 isn’t exactly exemplary. Namely, it lets off 48-note polyphone audio which is far from perfect, but far from being bad too.

When compared to our previous pick (The One Smart keyboard), this piano keyboard has lighted keys, which means that they’re slightly easier to play, making them best suited for beginners. The bad thing, however, is that the tension isn’t adjustable.

Another great feature for beginners is the light up keys feature which we’ve already seen with dozens of models. All things considered, Casio’s LK190 is a cheap piano with beginner-oriented action and lighted keys – if that’s something you’re looking for, the LK190 will undoubtedly deliver.

Pros:

  • Exceptionally versatile piano keyboard
  • 100 rhythms and 60 integrated songs
  • Step up lesson system
  • Light up keys, lighted action

Cons

  • Most of the features are only good for beginners

Casio’s CTK 3500 and LK190 are similar in many respects. Though both of these piano keyboards belong to the same price point categories and pack a relatively similar feature setup, there are some differences between them still, which provided enough room for the CTK 3500 in our review.

First, let’s discuss the similarities. Namely, both of these piano keyboards have 400 timbres and 100 rhythms – the difference is that the presets and sound banks aren’t exactly the same, and it’s hard to tell which model has ‘better’ voices. The punchline is that they’re both pretty good for the money regarding this sphere of performance.

Secondly, there’s the 48 polyphony audio output, which we’ve briefly talked about just a while ago – not perfect, not bad either.

Now, the first big difference is that this piano isn’t necessarily a beginner piano, unlike LK190. It has touch sensitive keys (without the light up feature) that provide a feel similar to playing a real acoustic piano.

On a side note, let’s not forget that this is, after all, a relatively cheap piano keyboard. It’s great that it’s versatile and still helpful for beginners while still being strong performance wise to sate the needs of more seasoned players.

Pros:

  • Exceptional versatility
  • Formidable speakers
  • Good for beginners
  • 400 voices and 100 rhythm styles
  • Touch sensitive keys

Cons

  • Hard-to-read front panel where the voices and settings are listed

M Audio’s MK3 is basically a USB keyboard piano which, in our opinion, better fits in this particular segment of our review because it features semi weighted keys. Though it doesn’t provide the genuine experience of playing on a acoustic piano (with fully weighted keys), it’s strikingly different from nearly all models we’ve covered thus far.

First and foremost, this is a very compact piano keyboard which comes with 49 velocity sensitive keys. It also has modulation and pitch shifter sliders that might be game changing if you’re into recording your own music.

Some of the biggest benefits this keyboard piano brings to the table are compactness (due to its sheer small size) and portability (due to its lightweight construction). It’s not exceptionally versatile since it doesn’t feature a huge number of piano voices, but it’s pretty cheap and quite exquisite due to the peculiar set of features it comes supplied with.

Pros:

  • Velocity sensitive keys
  • Small size and lightweight construction
  • Volume fader, pitch shifter, and modulation features
  • USB compliant 

Cons

  • Low versatility
  • Not exactly authentic voices

The last keyboard piano in our ‘best weighted keyboard’ section is another Yamaha, this time it’s YPT 360. It’s fairly big and maybe not the cheapest keyboard out there, but it’s still a Yamaha, which means that you should be expecting quite a lot from it.

YPT 360 packs a huge array of voices, including 574 sound effects, 165 auto-accompaniment styles, and 150 arpeggio types. This is by far the most versatile cheap keyboard piano we’ve managed to find, regardless of the price point categories.

What’s really great about it is the fact that it has 61 touch sensitive keys with selectable levels of pressure tension. It’s great for beginners if you don’t mind the sheer number of voices most people will play around with at some point.

It’s also USB compliant and capable of two-way MIDI audio transfer, so recording music with it is all too easy.

Pros:

  • A huge number of voices and auto-accompaniment styles
  • Great for beginners
  • USB compliant
  • Touch sensitive keys

Cons

  • Pretty hard to use outright, requires some getting used to

Best 88 Key Keyboard Pianos

Yamaha’s DGX 660 is a moderately expensive 88 key digital piano bundle which is comprised of a piano stand, a sustain pedal, the MP 703 microphone, and the RH1C headphones.

One of the best things about this keyboard is the Pure-CF sound engine which provides exceptionally authentic voices, as well as the GHS-weighted action. It’s also record compliant and allows you to use six separate tracks for your sessions, with the only downfall being that it costs quite a bit.

Pros:

  • GHS action
  • Pure-CF sound engine
  • Authentic voices
  • Six track recording

Cons

  • Expensive

See our review here.

Pros:

  • Gigging bundle
  • Authentic piano voices
  • Fully weighted keys
  • Incredibly real-like action

Cons

  • Fairly expensive

Roland’s keyboards are in the same league as Yamaha’s, and FP 30 is more than capable of going toe to toe with some of the best pianos out there.

Basically, this is a gigging bundle, just like our previous two picks. It features a damper pedal, a X-style stand, a piano stool, and a set of high quality headphones.

As for the FP 30 itself, it has 88 keys with adjustable touch sensitivity, several playing modes, and a humble selection of timbres and rhythms. Overall, it’s not cheap, but it’s well worth the cash.

Pros:

  • Adjustable touch sensitivity
  • Comes with gratis headphones, stool, and stand
  • Authentic voices
  • Great value for the money

Cons

  • Low versatility

Korg’s SP 170S BK2 is a beautiful, beautiful piano which has some of the most realistic voice effects available. It has a set of easy to use controls, a humble package of 10 voices (including a harpsichord, strings, electric pianos and such).

It has a natural weighted action that resembles that of an acoustic grand piano, but if you don’t feel like it suits you, there are three selectable levels of touch sensitivity at your disposal. In a nutshell, this is a great sounding piano keyboard that, though it’s not overly versatile, offers premium performance and a huge value for the money.

Pros:

  • Ten piano, harpsichord, and string voices
  • Exceptionally great sound
  • Adjustable touch sensitivity
  • Natural weighted action

Cons

  • Low versatility
  • Moderately expensive

Although it comes from an underdog brand, Williams Legato III is a fairly basic piano which features touch sensitive keys, 10 piano voices, Bluetooth connection, and several other premium quality features.

Most of the (ten) voices are decently realistic. Another great benefit it brings to the table is the fact that it’s pretty lightweight and compact, but to top it all, it’s powered by a pair of dual driver speakers. It’s perfect for beginners, although intermediate level players could benefit from authentic sounds and great connectivity Legato III offers.

Pros:

  • Touch sensitive keys
  • Ten sounds
  • Bluetooth connectivity
  • Powerful dual driver speakers

Cons

  • Low versatility

Best USB Piano Keyboards

Let’s start the last section of our review with Novation’s LaunchKey. It features 16 RGB backlit drum pads and 61 pressure sensitive keys. It’s a wonderful keyboard if you intend to record your music, and what’s even better is that you’ll get the Ableton Lite 9 software as a bonus.

There are eight knobs, nine sliders, and six transport controls onboard, two octave & transpose buttons, seven segment LED display, 2-track MIDI channels, and plenty of other recording features. The only real downfall is that there’s only a limited number of voices and effects you’ll be able to use standalone, so it might not be the best keyboard for practice or beginners.

Pros:

  • Plenty of recording features
  • Velocity sensitive keys
  • RGB backlit drum pads
  • Not overly expensive

Cons

  • Definitely not good for beginners
  • Might not be so suitable for practice due to the lack of voices

Yamaha’s PSR series was one of their most successful hits during their lengthy business career and here we’re looking at the E363 model. It’s remarkably versatile, having 197 sound voices, 18 drum presets, and 339 XgLite voices. What’s more, there are 154 preset demonstration songs so you can step up your technique easily.

Effect types include reverbs, equalizers, harmony, and chorus, and you’ll be able to make use of the 2-track recorder to tape your music. Again, this is one of those more affordable Yamaha pianos, so it’s pretty great that it offers even this much.

Pros:

  • Hundreds of voices and preset songs
  • Portable and light
  • Great for recording and for beginners
  • Decently affordable

Cons

  • Most voices aren’t as authentic

Next up is M Audio’s Oxygen MKIV keyboard. Basically, it’s a recording keyboard with eight velocity sensitive trigger pads, eight assignable knobs, and 49 synth action velocity sensitive keys. To top it all, it also comes with Pro Tools software.

Among the main benefits this keyboard offers we can name portability, amazing recording capabilities, and pretty great sonic performance. If 49 keys aren’t doing the job for you, this model is also available in 61-key variation.

Pros:

  • Absolutely perfect for recording
  • Eight velocity sensitive trigger pads and assignable knobs
  • Comes with Pro Tools
  • Decently versatile

Cons

  • Weak speakers

Nektar’s Impact GX61 is a phenomenal USB keyboard. It features synth action keys, an onboard pitch bender, as well as a modulation wheel which come very useful during live performances. There are 14 MIDI buttons onboard and a couple dozens of integrated voices.

The GX61’s biggest forte is definitely compactness, as it leaves a such small footprint that it won’t take up virtually any space (if upright). It boasts quite a value for the buck due to its awesome performance and affordability.

Pros:

  • Synth action keys
  • Pitch bender and modulation wheels
  • DAW integration
  • 14 MIDI buttons
  • Compact and light

Cons

  • Not so good for beginners

The last USB piano keyboard in this segment of our review is The One’s Smart Piano USB keyboard. Basically, it features a wonderful LED lighted set of 61 keys, a decently sensitive action, and a plethora of beginner friendly features.

In terms of design it’s relatively simple, and it’s a great thing that it’s remarkably easy to use. The speakers are very powerful and provide 128-note polyphony audio, meaning that performance wise this keyboard is a powerhouse.

There are over 120 downloadable voices – although there are only a couple of them onboard, you can easily access them via mobile applications.

Pros:

  • Simple design
  • LED lighted keys
  • Decently sensitive action
  • Lightweight and compact
  • Advantage 6

Cons

  • The voices are downloadable, not integrated

Keyboard Piano Buying Guide

Best Keyboard Piano Brands

There are hundreds of big names in the industry, but if we’re to name the top 3, they would definitely be Yamaha, Korg, and Roland.

Yamaha’s been around for a century, and you’ve probably heard about their PSR keyboards and workstations. If not, feel free to take a step back and browse through our review, as we’ve added several of their premium quality models across different categories.

Korg is relatively younger, being around for only 57 years, although they’re a Japanese brand as well. They produce premium quality keyboards and electric organs, so if you’re looking for quality and don’t feel like you’re prepared to cash out a Yamaha model, Korg would do just fine.

An even younger Japanese keyboard manufacturer – Roland – deals with computer-related products, musical instruments, and various electronics. They’re pretty famous for making premium quality amps and keyboards, some of their most renowned models being A500, A800 Pro, and A 49.

Now, don’t feel dissuaded to give other brands a go. Kawai is pretty popular, and most professional pianists would easily agree that Casio is a formidable brand as well. There are a lot of underdog brands, some of which we’ve included in our review, so make sure to check them out as well.

How many keys are there on a keyboard piano?

Basically, a full sized piano has a set of 88 keys, although ‘shorter’ options are also available. The second most common number of keys on a keyboard is 61, which is also a pretty popular option among pianists these days. There are also pianos that have only 25 keys, but they’re mainly used for practice when compactness is really needed.

What keyboard has the best piano sounds?

In truth, digital pianos have the best piano sounds – digital keyboards seldom do. However, there are some models that aim to provide authentic grand piano acoustic sounds, and even though there’s only a small number of them, we’ve covered several of these in our review.

The best piano sounds you could get for the buck are available on Korg’s PA4X professional arranger. Even though this wonderful digital piano keyboard has quite a lot of benefits to offer, some of them also include the most authentic piano sounds.

Since PA4X comes at an incredibly high price, a bit more affordable option is Yamaha’s MOXF8. It boasts a great action, as well as a big set of high-quality complementary features, but, just like Korg’s model, it’s fairly expensive as well.

Another great Yamaha model is DGX660. It’s powered by the CF engine which samples Yamaha’s concert pianos, so if authenticity is what you’re after (and if you don’t have the cash for Korg’s PA4X or Yamaha’s MOFX8), this might be your best bet.

Last, but certainly not least, Kawai’s ES110 made quite a buzz during the period of last couple of years, mainly because its default voices sound absolutely amazing. Airy, transparent piano sounds are, perhaps, the lowest bar of expectations you could set when it comes to this phenomenal keyboard piano.

All things considered, these are all phenomenal pianos, but you’ll notice that they all cost quite a lot – some a fortune, some a bit less, but still a lot. The main reason for that is because digital keyboards weren’t tailor-made to provide organic piano sounds – only the best of the best have authentic piano voices.

It might be worth your while to invest in a digital piano if you’re looking for actual grand piano sounds – digital keyboards boast huge levels of versatility that could be utilized in various other fields.

Difference between keyboard piano and digital piano

Here’s the thing – digital pianos and digital keyboards can be treated as synonyms at times. This is mostly due to the fact that certain brands (market giants included) often go out of the boundaries and put up exceptions from rules with their new flagship models every once in a while.

However, if we’re to exclude those exceptions entirely, there are certain differences between digital pianos and keyboards.

First, and one of the most obvious difference is the sheer design and size. Namely, digital pianos are usually bigger and don’t have integrated speakers, whereas digital keyboards rely on compactness and portability.

Secondly, there’s a huge difference in sound quality. Digital pianos lack the versatility of keyboards who come supplied with hundreds and hundreds of different voices (most of which are digitalized through and through), whereas digital pianos have a couple sound choices at most. However, this small number of voice options always sounds better in comparison to the former.

Thirdly, keyboards usually have either smaller keys or lighter actions, emphasizing playability over feel. Digital pianos are actually preferred by pianists who have various reasons why they need the actual weighted action which digital pianos have for the most part.

Lastly, it’s important to note that exceptions are not only possible, but more and more present with each passing day. Now we have digital piano keyboards – a hybrid of sorts which combines the benefits (and comes with drawbacks) of both categories. The bottom line is that the differences between digital pianos and digital keyboards fade with the myriad of upgrades and advancements in technology.

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