Best Chorus Pedal 2018 | Reviews & Comprehensive Buying Guide

A foreword about chorus pedals before we begin

Before we even get to the chorus pedals, let’s discuss what the “chorus effect is”. First of all, the “chorus” refers to a subtle modulation of your guitar’s (or bass guitar’s) sound – this effect is “delaying”, or better yet “detuning” a part of the signal, but this shouldn’t be confused with the delay effect which is significantly more pronounced.

Now, a chorus pedal splits the signal of your guitar in two, but only one of the fragments will be de-tuned. Depending on the model and the way you tweak the knobs of your chorus pedal, the change in your sound could be minor or huge.

We’re here to guide you on your way of picking the best chorus pedal for the cash, after which we’ll jump over to some of the most popular pedals, so without any further ado, let’s get straight to it.


Best Overall Chorus Pedal 2018

Model name

Chorus effect quality

Pedal complexity

Price

Extra

Exceptional

Difficult to use, easy-to-read LCD display

$$$

Superb chorus quality

Relatively easy to use

$$$$

Superb chorus quality

Very easy to use

$$$$

Outstanding chorus quality

Very easy to use

$$$$$

Exceptional

Supremely easy to use

$$$$$

1. Zoom ZMS70CDR MS-70CDR - Best Chorus Pedal 2018

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Let’s open up our review of the best chorus pedals with Zoom’s ZMS70CDR – we’ll call it shortly MultiStomp. Basically, this is an incredibly versatile pedal which features numerous chorus, reverb, and delay effects.

The reason why we’ve included in our review even though we’re mainly interested in chorus pedals is simple – it’s just too good for the buck to pass. While there are plenty of things you could like about it, we should warn you in advance – it’s not that cheap. That being said, let’s see what you should expect out of Zoom’s Multistomp.

Versatility and complexity:

Basically, Zone’s Multistomp can be used for virtually all playingstyles and music genres – it comes outfitted with eighty six effect types, including sixteen choruses, twenty six delays, twenty nine reverbs, and fifteen various other effects which include flangers, tremolos, vibratos, phases, and modulators.

What’s really important that Multistomp features numerous sound types – even though you’ll get to play with your chorus effects quite a lot, you’ll also be able to make your sound exquisite with 3 Fender sound presets (Fender’s Twin Reverb, Fender’s Deluxe Reverb, and the Tweed Bassman), Vox’s AC30, as well as Marshall’s Plexi (the latter which is incredibly sought-after).

So, as far as versatility is in question, it’s quite easy to conclude that Zoom’s Multistomp is, by far, one of the most versatile pedals ever made.

Price:

Simply put, Zoom’s Multistomp belongs to the lower bracket of the “expensive” price point category, which basically means it costs quite a lot. So, if you’re looking for a premium-quality, versatile chorus pedal (and more), this is the one you should be getting.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Given that Zoom’s Multistomp is a boutique level chorus pedal, we recommend it to professionals and veterans, as most beginners wouldn’t feel too inclined to pay such a hefty sum, regardless of how valuable it is

What we liked about this pedal:

Zoom’s Multistomp is, plainly put, a perfect pedal for any occasion and for every guitarist. It’s as versatile as can be, sports a durable housing, and it offers a very unique way to get your own special sound, completely negating the need for an overburdened rig with dozens of pedals.

What we thought could be improved:

There are just two issues we just couldn’t look past – the Multistomp doesn’t work on regular batteries (it operates on AA batteries which usually don’t last more than 6-7 hours), and the adapter is sold separately. However, once you do get the adapter, the only real issue is the price, as it costs quite a lot.

Pros:

  • A total of eighty six effect types
  • Easy to use interface
  • One of the most versatile pedals ever made
  • Superb value for the buck
  • check-circle
    Ideal for professional guitarists

Cons:

  • Works on AA batteries
  • The AC adapter is sold separately

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Digitech’s Nautila is a combo chorus plus flanger pedal – it’s not a plain pedal per se, but it packs quite a punch for the buck. Apart from sporting a funky, exquisite design, this pedal is decently versatile, doesn’t cost a fortune (although it isn’t cheap), and it can accommodate virtually all music playing styles. Let’s see the details about Nautila.

Versatility and complexity:

The best thing about Nautila is the flexible chorus section – there is a total of 8 chorus effects combined with 4 flanger voices, making it pretty versatile and handy in nearly all situations. There are four control knobs you can use to specify the tone of your flanger (or the definition of your chorus), which might lead you to conclusion that it’s decently easy to use, alas, you’ll definitely need a week or two to get accustomed to its features.

Price:

Compared to Zoom’s Multistomp, Nautila appears to be somewhat cheaper – it’s just a bit less expensive than our previous pick, but it’s essentially in the same price point category. Just like the Multistomp, Nautila boasts a huge value for the cash, though.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

People who don’t mind experimenting with their sound and want to get the most from their chorus pedal should definitely consider Nautila – since it’s not as easy to use as most plain chorus pedals, we recommend it to intermediate-level and professional guitarists.

What we liked about this pedal:

First of all, we liked the funky design Nautila sports – it looks unique and warm, but the same can be said about its sound quality. The only thing that’s capable of overshadowing the difficulty of using this pedal is its sound customization potential.

What we thought could be improved:

Being a relatively expensive chorus pedal, it’s not the price that we thought that could be improved in regard to Digitech’s Nautila. Basically, there are plenty of things you could do with it, but all of which would require time to get accustomed to, so, in a nutshell – the expensiveness and complexity of Nautila are the only “bad” things about it.

Pros:

  • Superb sound quality
  • Tremendous sound customization potential
  • Combo chorus and flanger pedal
  • Exceptionally

Cons:

  • Quite difficult to use
  • Pricey

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

TC Electronic is one of the biggest names in guitar tech industry, and to top it all, they’re the ones “responsible” for Dream Theater’s John Petrucci Signature multi-effect pedal. In essence, this is a combo pedal which features a combination of John’s distinctive chorus, flanger, and vibrato effects, two of each, so if you’re a DT fan, make sure to at least consider this pedal.

Versatility and complexity:

Surprisingly enough, the “Dreamscape” isn’t too hard to use – it does have four control knobs, but each is pretty self-explanatory and plain. As for the versatility, you’ll get two choruses, two flangers, and two vibratos to play around – if that’s not enough, the control knobs (FX level, Speed, and Depth) will allow you to further define the intensity of the used effects.

Price:

We’ve seen expensive, but John Petrucci’s “Dreamscape” made us redefine the term - the “Dreamscape” belongs to the medium bracket of the “expensive” price point category, and it’s the most expensive chorus pedal we’ve reviewed so far.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Ideally, Dream Theater and John Petrucci’s fans who want to nail his exquisite sound down require the Dreamscape to do so. Other than that, guitarists who want a clearly defined sound packed with plenty of flexibility should consider the Dreamscape.

What we liked about this pedal:

It’s plain to use, there’s a ton of customization potential to benefit from, and you’ll get a total of 6 signature John Petrucci tones to play around with (two for each effect). Apart from that, the Dreamscape boasts an unparalleled value for the cash and sports a highly durable casing.

What we thought could be improved:

Frankly, the only “bad” thing about John Petrucci’s signature Dreamscape multi-effect pedal is the price – it’s just too expensive, even for certain professionals, let alone intermediate and beginner guitarists.

Pros:

  • Six premium-quality tone effects
  • Sturdy, fashionable casing
  • Exceptionally versatile
  • True bypass
  • check-circle
    Great for Dream Theatre fans

Cons:

  • Costs an arm and a leg

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Deep, mesmerizing chorus is something most professional guitarists are searching for, and luckily enough, Source Audio SA242 Gemini is more than capable of delivering it. This is a flexible, versatile boutique level chorus pedal that offers you the opportunity to customize your sound on a completely different level.

Versatility and complexity:

At first sight, the Source Audio SA242 Gemini looks like a moderately complex effect pedal – it features only four control knobs (depth, speed, mix, and tone), and it’s casing is somewhat bulkier than that of most effect pedals. However, it comes outfitted with three chorus types, it features universal bypasses, tap tempo, and expression control, so there’s plenty of sound customization potential to go about.

Price:

Just like John Petrucci’s signature chorus pedal, the Source Audio SA242 Gemini belongs to the medium bracket of the “expensive” price point category. Although it does cost quite a lot, this pedal is well worth the cash if you’re really looking to spice your sound up with some of the most exquisite chorus effects ever.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

This pedal is MIDI compatible if you couple it with Neuro Hub, allowing you to save some 128 presets, and that’s completely apart from its original superb versatility. Knowing this, there’s no end to things you could do with it, although people who are frequently recording and performing live would benefit the most from it.

What we liked about this pedal:

The sheer plainness combined with impeccable versatility of Source Audio SA242 Gemini got us – this is one of the best easy-to-use boutique level guitar pedals, and even though it does cost quite a lot, you won’t find a better model in the price range.

What we thought could be improved:

Apart from the high price, Source Audio SA242 Gemini requires a hub in order to utilize the sound presets. That’s the only thing we thought could be improved, although it wouldn’t hurt if the price was just a bit below than the actual.

Pros:

  • Exquisite features (universal bypass, expression control)
  • Three high-quality chorus effects
  • Superb value for the money
  • Parametric EQ

Cons:

  • Needs a hub for presets
  • Costs quite a lot

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

The last chorus pedal in our “best overall chorus pedal” section comes from Catalinbread – if you never heard about these guys, they’re quite important on the guitar tech market. In fact, they are dominating virtually all branches with models such as Callisto Chorus, Dirty Little Secret, Galileo, and others. Today we’re going to take a gander at Callisto Chorus.

Versatility and complexity:

In essence, Catalinbread’s Callisto is a combination of chorus and vibrato effects, but even still it’s not as complex or versatile as one might think. The “density” knob governs the delay time of the chorus, the “width” adjusts the sweep depth, “MIX” is used for fine tuning, and the “rate” should be used for finishing touches.

Even though it’s not too versatile, the Callisto Chorus pedal offers some of the most exquisite sounds and boasts a huge sound customization potential.

Price:

Catalinbread’s Callisto Chorus pedal is the most expensive chorus pedal in our review, as it belongs to the upper bracket of the “expensive” price point category.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Simply because it costs a lot doesn’t mean that Catalinbread’s Callisto is reserved for professional and intermediate level guitarists – it’s true that they would benefit from it the most, but whoever is searching for unique, exquisite chorus effects should try it out.

What we liked about this pedal:

The controls are simple and fairly flexible, allowing you to customize your sound in the easiest way possible. Apart from that, the versatility of this pedal is great, although not the best. One of the best things about this pedal is its reliability – it can be put nearly anywhere in the chain.

What we thought could be improved:

The only thing we didn’t particularly like about this pedal is its price – the controls are easy, versatility is ok, casing’s durability is top notch, and the general sound output is something to marvel at.

Pros:

  • Outstanding sound quality...
  • check-circle
    One of the best chorus pedals ever made
  • Chorus plus vibrato combo
  • High sound customization potential
  • Can be put anywhere in the chain

Cons:

  • The most expensive pedal in this review

Best Guitar Chorus Pedal 2018

Model name

Versatility

Easy to use

Price

Extra

Moderate

Very easy to use

$$$

Decently versatile

Plain chorus pedal, easy to use

$$$$

Lots of settings and control knobs, pretty versatile

Decently easy to use

$$$$

1. TC Electronic Corona - Best Guitar Chorus Pedal 2018

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Our opener of the best guitar chorus pedal models is TC Electronic’s Corona – if you liked their “Dreamscape” (John Petrucci’s signature pedal), you’re definitely going to love this one. In essence, this is a premium-quality boutique level chorus pedal which comes outfitted with plain, yet formidable settings.

Versatility and complexity:

TC Electronic’s Corona chorus pedal is pretty much plain – it features only four knobs (Speed, Depth, FX Level, and Tone), and a tri-way pot (Chorus, toneprint, and tri-chrorus). These options allow you to customize the chorus you are searching for with a broad range of options, but let’s note that this is among the first non-combo chorus pedals in our review. Regardless, the settings it comes supplied with are very plain to use and provide just about enough sound customization potential.

Price:

Corona surely is expensive, although not nearly as much as, for example, John Petrucci signature “Dreamscape”. It’s one of the best guitar chorus pedal models as it provides pristine clear chorus along with true bypass, topped with a huge array of options at your disposal regarding the sound customization.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Generally, people who know what they are looking for will be more than content to try Corona out – there are no factory built in presets that would allow you to simply “flip the switch” and sound exquisite right off the bat, so you’ll have to toy around with the knobs a bit – that being said, immediate beginner guitarists should, perhaps, skip this model.

What we liked about this pedal:

The chorus blends embedded into TC Electronic’s Corona are very subtle, yet distinct when compared to each other. Figuring out how to set the parameters of the knobs won’t be too hard, and true bypass ensures that zero tone is lost should something happen to your signal chain. Overall, this is a plain-looking, yet unique chorus pedal.

What we thought could be improved:

Frankly, there aren’t any notable flaws you should be worried about regarding TC Electronic’s Corona – it’s just a bit more expensive than regular chorus pedals, but it makes up for it with excellent performance and superb reliability.

Pros:

  • Very easy to use
  • Two distinctive chorus effects
  • Outstanding performance and value
  • Durable casing
  • check-circle
    True bypass

Cons:

  • Costly

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Classy and elegant, Carl Martin’s Vintage CLSHR chorus effect pedal is one of the best-looking pedals out there. Since we’re not overly interested in aesthetics, it wouldn’t hurt to say that this pedal sounds as good as it looks – it’s expensive, it looks expensive, and it sounds expensive.

Versatility and complexity:

It wouldn’t be right to talk about versatility when we talk about Carl Martin’s CLSHR chorus pedal, mainly because it’s not exactly an example of high-end well-rounded pedal. However, that’s not necessarily a bad thing – vintage chorus pedals are supposed to sound old-school, and that’s precisely what this one does.

That being said, it’s quite obvious that this is a very plain pedal which is surprisingly easy to use. Tweaking the knobs (Speed, Depth, Rate, and Level), you’ll get the idea why this pedal is so responsive – even the slightest bump to the either side changes the definition of your chorus sound.

Price:

This pedal doesn’t get the attention it deserves, which is, perhaps, the reason why it’s slightly more expensive than it’s actually valuable – rest assured, if you’re looking for a vintage-like sound, this pedal is perfect for you, but know that it will cost you quite a lot.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Old-school rockers, solo guitarists, and generally people who yearn for the nostalgic vintage-like sound shouldn’t pass up the opportunity to try Carl Martin’s CLSHR chorus pedal. Other than that, its low versatility won’t appeal to guitarists who shift between genres and playing styles frequently.

What we liked about this pedal:

The single most beautiful thing about this pedal is its responsiveness. Basically, shifting the Rate knob clockwise turns your chorus into a vibrato (and vice versa). What’s more, the “Depth” knob will give or “eat” your highs, allowing you to muddy up your sound or make it pristine clear.

What we thought could be improved:

This pedal isn’t very versatile and it does cost quite a bit – these two things are, however, the only flaws of Carl Martin’s chorus pedal.

Pros:

  • Incredibly responsive
  • Works well with overdrive, fuzz, flange, and distortion effects
  • Universal knobs and true bypass
  • Incredible vintage like sound

Cons:

  • Pricey
  • Not exactly versatile

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Simply hearing the name, you know it – MXR has brought a plethora of premium-quality guitar pedals to the market, and we’ve picked out their M134 stereo chorus for our “best guitar chorus pedal” review. Truth be told, it’s a bit bulky, even for a stompbox, but it has quite a few tricks up its sleeve to compensate for its size.

Versatility and complexity:

The MXR134 Stereo Chorus pedal is all but plain and straightforward – some people go even further by stating that “there are too many knobs onboard”, but that just supports the fact that it’s as versatile as can be.

With a total of five knobs (bass, treble, intensity, width, and rate), you can define your chorus, sparkle up your solos, animate heavy-strummed passages, fatten up the power chords, or simply add a little bit of juice to your acoustics.

Price:

The MXR 134 Stereo Chorus pedal belongs to the upper bracket of the “expensive” price point category. While being quite pricey, it shows promise of quality and boasts a huge value for the money.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Beginner guitarists, steer clear of M134 chorus pedal – its full potential can only be realized by crafty hands of professionals and veterans (apropos the statement “it has too much knobs”). On top of being a bit harder to use than a regular chorus pedal, its price will easily dissuade even the intermediate-level guitar players.

What we liked about this pedal:

There’s a lot to be had if you know what you are looking for – the M134 can accommodate virtually every playing style and music genre, provided that you have the time and skill the set the knobs in such a way that they’ll complement your sound.

What we thought could be improved:

It’s hard to use, expensive, and not exactly beginner friendly. When put like that, one might wonder what’s so valuable about the M134 – it’s a professional chorus pedal, used and favoured by professionals, so if you, indeed have what it takes, you’ll find that M134 is one of the best pedals ever made.

Pros:

  • One of the most versatile chorus pedals ever made
  • Outstanding sound quality
  • Unmatched sound customization potential
  • Huge value for the buck
  • check-circle
    Ideal for professional guitarists

Cons:

  • Quite hard to use
  • Not suited for beginners
  • times-circle
    Pricey

Best Bass Chorus Pedal 2018

Model name

Versatility

Easy to use

Price

Extra

Moderately versatile

Plain and straightforward chorus pedal

$$$

Mediocre versatility

Exceptionally easy to use

$$$

Moderately versatile

Very easy to use

$$$$

1. Boss CEB-3 Bass Chorus Pedal - Best Bass Chorus Pedal 2018

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

When in doubt, rely on Boss – millions and millions of musicians across the globe will easily support this statement, as this brand makes some of the finest guitar and bass tech pieces that money can buy. We’ve picked out the CEB-3 bass chorus pedal as our opener, and we hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

Versatility and complexity:

With the dedicated chorus design, your bass’s strength will remain in full power, regardless of how you tweak the knobs. Speaking of which, there are four of them onboard – the level, low filter, rate, and depth. The low filter is, perhaps, the most interesting feature of this pedal, as it filters the lowest frequencies and emits them pristine clear. Like (almost) all Boss pedals, the CEB-3 is very, very easy to use.

Price:

Doesn’t cost a fortune, but doesn’t come cheap – this would be the best definition of Boss CEB-3’s price. It belongs to the lowest bracket of the “expensive” price point category and would barely pass on as a “boutique” level pedal based on the price.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Bass players who want to add a bit of chorus without losing the paunchiness of their original sound will find this pedal as incredibly valuable. Others who wish for a drastic, ground breaking change, we advise you to move on to our next pick.

What we liked about this pedal:

The sheer name of “Boss” implies reliability and value, before all else. This pedal is very well built, it’s moderately versatile, and it features the “low filter” feature which will preserve the initial strength of your bass guitar’s sound.

What we thought could be improved:

Like we’ve already mentioned, the CEB-3 isn’t exactly “earth shattering” chorus pedal. It’s very light (in both performance and actual weight), and it will only spice up your game, rather than change it completely.

Pros:

  • Significantly easier to use than most chorus pedals
  • Superior Boss quality
  • Durable casing
  • Low filter & true bypass

Cons:

  • Light-duty chorus pedal
  • Isn’t exactly cheap

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

The Bass Clone is a wonderful, relatively cheap chorus pedal which comes outfitted with several plain features. The depth knob governs the effect’s modulation, the “rate” affects the overall speed of your chorus (how rapidly it will rise or fall) while the treble & bass should be used for fine tuning. Generally, the sound customization potential of this pedal is decent, well above the average.

Versatility and complexity:

In general, the Electro Harmonix Bass Clone isn’t overly versatile – there’s a finite amount of options at your disposal regarding the chorus effect you’ll be searching for, although the exquisite “X-Over” switch allows you to subtly cut the lower end of your sound’s wet signal. It’s not too difficult to use it, although it would hardly pass as a “plain pedal” per se.

Price:

Electro Harmonix Bass Clone isn’t too expensive, and some even consider it as cheap. It’s one of the best chorus pedal models you could get under $100, and it boasts a tremendous value for the buck.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Bass players who want to spice up their tone with a bit of plain chorus (and who don’t mind cutting down the lower end of their sound) will benefit the most from this pedal. Essentially, a straightforward bass pedal such as Bass Clone can shine in virtually anyone’s hands, as it doesn’t cost much and does a good job for the price.

What we liked about this pedal:

Apart from the great price, we were pretty content with what this chorus pedal had to offer in terms of versatility and easiness of use. It’s great for everyone, it’s affordable, and excels in several fields of performance.

What we thought could be improved:

Generally, the Bass Clone doesn’t offer anything new – there are plenty of unique bass pedals, and if you’re looking to completely redefine your tone, this might not be the perfect pedal for you. Apart from that, the switch produces a rather nosy sound when you activate it – nothing substantial, though, but bothersome nevertheless.

Pros:

  • Plain and straightforward bass chorus pedal
  • Great for the cash
  • Very easy to use and setup
  • Can complement virtually every playing style and music genre

Cons:

  • Lacks uniqueness in tone
  • The switch produces a loud noise when activated

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

We’re wrapping up our review of the best bass chorus pedal models with Aguilar’s Chorusaurus – it’s as “dangerous” as it sounds, and it might just be the finest bass chorus effect pedal ever created. It’s an all-analog pedal providing a fat chorus which boasts a tremendous level of versatility and sound customization potential, so without any further ado, let’s get straight to the review.

Versatility and complexity:

This analog bass chorus pedals features the bucket-brigade technology which produces incredibly lush chorus sounds. Both mono and stereo output jacks are present, and the blend controls allow you to fine-tune and define the intensity, width, rate, and blend of your sound.

What’s more, it also comes outfitted with a “Gig-saver” type bypass which will ensure that the signal remains even if the battery dies. At first sight it might not look too versatile, but Chorusaurus is most certainly among the finest all-around pedals for bass players. The controls aren’t too hard to set properly, although you might need a week or two to get accustomed to the pedal’s responsiveness.

Price:

Aguilar’s Chorusaurus is very expensive – it belongs to the upper bracket of the “expensive” price range, and it’s among the priciest chorus pedals among the seventeen we’re reviewing. Don’t let that dissuade you, though – if you’re looking for the best, this is the one.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Professional bass players, especially those who are performing live will benefit the most from this pedal – the incredible versatility combined with impeccable reliability (due to Gig-saver bypass) are just some of the qualities you can put your trust in.

What we liked about this pedal:

This pedal provides a fat, defined chorus and allows you to specify every little bit of it along the way. As formidable as it is, we even liked the price – good things don’t come cheap, and the same applies to Chorusaurus. Excellent, all-around chorus tone, reliable power output, and the bucket-brigade tech are the things we liked the most.

What we thought could be improved:

In all fairness, we failed to find any flaws regarding the Chorusaurus whatsoever. Sure, it’s expensive, but it surpasses nearly all similar bass pedals in the price range in value with ease.

Pros:

  • Very durable casing
  • Gig-saver bypass
  • Easy-to-use controls
  • Superb versatility
  • check-circle
    Ideal for live performers

Cons:

  • No major flaws whatsoever

Best Analog Chorus Pedal 2018

Model name

Versatility

Easy to use

Price

Extra

Decently versatile

Quite easy to use

$$$

Not overly versatile

One of the simplest chorus pedals

$$$$

Not versatile – comes with only one button

Incredibly easy to use

$$

1. MXR M234 Analog Chorus Pedal - Best Analog Chorus Pedal 2018

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Let’s open up our review of the best analog chorus pedal models with MXR’s M234 – a high-quality chorus pedal which provides exceptional tone control. It’s compact design and awesome sound customization potential are unparalleled, so guitarists who are still searching for their sound, look no further – the M234 is, perhaps, the ultimate mid-priced chorus pedal on the market of today.

Versatility and complexity:

Rich, enticing chorus is the least you could expect from MXR’s M234 chorus pedal – it’s outfitted with bucket-brigade circuitry that provide authentic, liquid textures to your tone. It’s as versatile as all-analog pedals can be – there are five control knobs, including low, high, level, rate, and depth, allowing you to easily specify the amount of juice you want to squeeze from your chorus.

Even though there are many buttons and knobs, the MXR M234 is surprisingly easy to use, and the controls are decently easy to figure out – all analog pedals are highly responsive after all.

Price:

Simply put, MXR’s M234 is moderately pricey – it’s not expensive per se, but on the other hand, it could hardly pass for a cheap pedal. Most people who’ve used it have reported that they were happy about paying it as much as they did, and negative reviews are either too hard to find or nonexistent whatsoever.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Modern musicians, especially beginners refrain from using all-analog pedals, and the same goes for chorus pedals. Whether it’s because people are getting more reliant on digital tech or simply because digital pedals are getting more spotlight, we can’t be sure. What we do know, however, is that old-school musicians and people who want to spice up their sound in an inexpensive way should definitely consider MXR’s M234.

What we liked about this pedal:

Its price is great – for a moderately priced pedal, M234 passed all our performance checks with flying colors. Surely enough, there are more balanced, more versatile pedals, but the thing we really liked about this particular model is that it’s nearly flawless. It excels in numerous fields of performance, including the easiness of use, tone control, sound quality, reliability, and more.

What we thought could be improved:

The only thing this pedal needs in order to be perfect and flawless is a proper buffer bypass. It comes outfitted with one, but it muffles and drowns the distortion (and similar sound modulation effects) once turned on.

Pros:

  • Decently good price
  • Great sound
  • Reliable and durable
  • Moderately versatile and quite easy to use

Cons:

  • Poorly built buffer bypass

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Here we have another exceptional Boss chorus pedal – the CE-2W Waza Craft has a lot of proving to do, since you’ve probably set the standards high if you liked the Boss 3-CEB (in the “best bass chorus pedal section). In essence, this is one of the most plain chorus pedals, given that it comes outfitted with but two control knobs (rate and depth), but that’s not even the start of what it can do.

Versatility and complexity:

Essentially, even though CE-2W Waza Craft features only two control knobs, it’s very versatile and can accommodate numerous playing styles and music genres. If the knobs aren’t enough for your taste, you can switch back to CE-1 which will bring you the vintage-like chorus CE-2’s predecessor provided. It’s never been easier to finely tune your chorus’ tone, as Boss made sure that this pedal is as easy to use as can be.

Price:

For an all-analog chorus pedal, the CE-2W Waza Craft is quite expensive – in fact, it’s nearly as pricey as Chorusaurus and Catalinbread’s Calisto. Though pricey, the CE-2W is an excellent analog chorus pedal, and we warmly recommend that you give it a shot.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Guitar players who are in need of a vintage like chorus and who don’t want to waste too much time setting up their pedal should definitely try this one. It’s incredibly easy to use, and it gives you just about enough versatility to find what you’re after.

What we liked about this pedal:

The sheer plainness of CE-2W Waza Craft is the first thing we liked. Chorus is a plain effect, and its emitters should be as straightforward as possible. What’s more, this pedal features both the actual CE-2W and its predecessor, the CE-1, and it’s very easy to switch between them, even while in the middle of a gig.

What we thought could be improved:

Firstly, CE-2W Waza Craft costs way too much for a pedal as plain as this. The lack of standard control knobs (lows, mids, intensity, and volume) isn’t doing it any favours too. Be it as it may, these flaws aren’t fatal per se.

Pros:

  • Great sounding chorus effect
  • Switchable CE-1 and CE-2W styles
  • Moderately versatile
  • Plain and compact design
  • check-circle
    Suitable for virtually any guitar rig

Cons:

  • Lacks some standard control knobs
  • Very expensive

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

We’ve seen the Bass Clone (best bass chorus pedal section), and now it’s time to see what the “Neo Clone” can do. As we’ve already established, Electro Harmonix is a reputable brand, but how well do they fare in the department of analog chorus pedals? Neo Clone is among the simplest pedals ever built, but there’s a lot of exquisiteness in both its name and form.

Versatility and complexity:

Generally, Small and Neo “clones” are pretty much alike. They’re both straightforward pedals that are easy to use, even by immediate beginner guitarists. However, the Neo Clone is the least versatile chorus pedal in our review as it comes with a single knob (rate) and a single switch (depth). It does, however, feature a true bypass, for all it’s worth.

Price:

Basically, we’re looking at a cheap analog chorus pedal – the Neo Clone belongs to the medium bracket of the “moderately affordable” price point category, and if you’re looking to save up some cash on your gear, this is a perfect pedal for you.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Live performers (both guitarists and bassists) who don’t rely too heavily on chorus effects would find Neo Clone as the best analog chorus pedal ever. Since it comes outfitted with but a single knob and a single switch, controlling how your chorus sounds onstage is both possible and very easy. Apart from that, musicians who want to get familiar with how chorus should sound will have an inexpensive way of doing so with the Neo Clone.

What we liked about this pedal:

There are three things that made us conclude that Electro Harmonix Neo Clone is one of the best analog chorus pedals ever. Firstly, it’s an analog pedal made by a reputable brand – the sound you’ll get from this pedal is consistent and reliable. Secondly, it’s not nearly as expensive as some other models in our review, making it great for beginners and people who haven’t had the opportunity to play around with chorus effects just yet.

Thirdly, there isn’t a pedal that is as easy to use as Electro Harmonix’ Neo Clone. One knob, one switch, one pedal – what you see is what you get.

What we thought could be improved:

Basically, there’s no need to improve anything – this pedal is intentionally plain and outfitted with but a small number of humble features. If it were to be improved, it wouldn’t be Neo Clone anymore – the only real issue is that “depth” is governed by a switch rather than a knob (can’t be finely tuned).

Pros:

  • Very affordable
  • All-analog pedal
  • Exceptionally easy to use
  • Compact design

Cons:

  • The “depth” can’t be finely tuned (operated by a switch)

Best Cheap Chorus Pedal 2018

Model name

Versatility

Easy to use

Price

Extra

Moderately versatile

Plain and straightforward

$$$

Very versatile

Takes some time to get accustomed to

$$

Mediocre level of versatility

Very easy to use

$$$

1. Donner Tutti Love - Best Cheap Chorus Pedal 2018

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Cheap chorus effect pedals are in abundance – there are just so many models to choose from, and this is the reason why we’re bringing you only the finest. We’re opening up our “best cheap chorus pedal” section with Donner’s Tutti Love effect pedal – a simple, quality tech piece which you will grow to love as soon as you start using it.

Basically, this is an all-analog effect pedal which features a fully aluminium-coated casing, a LED indicator, and three control settings (Rate, depth, and level). True bypass is also included, although it’s not as reliable as that of boutique level pedals.

Versatility and complexity:

For a cheap chorus pedal, Donner’s Tutti Love is just about averagely versatile. It allows you to customize your chorus with the most basic EQ controls, although that’s pretty much it – there are no special features, modes, or additional effects whatsoever. That being said, it’s only obvious that it’s remarkably easy to use it.

Price:

As far as cheap pedals go, the Tutti Love is faring great – even though you’ll be able to find pedals that are even cheaper, this particular model promises high quality for the buck.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Beginner guitarists, even intermediate-level players would be thrilled about how Donner’s Tutti Love chorus pedal sounds. It might not be a pedal that’s suitable for gigs or music recording sessions, but it will spice up your tone and allow you to redefine it with its humble set of features.

What we liked about this pedal:

Though cheap, Tutti Love is very well built. It features a sturdy aluminium housing, a LED indicator, and it’s an all-analog pedal. Its performance is top notch by cheap effect pedal standards too, and the chorus you’ll get from it can go from tender and gentle to twisty and buzzy.

What we thought could be improved:

Basically, being compact is usually a good thing, although that’s not the case with Tutti Love. If you are asking why that is so, then you’ll see for yourself when you connect it to your rig – it’s so small that it is very likely to turn over (unless the sheer weight doesn’t keep it in place). Apart from that, everything is pretty much fine.

Pros:

  • Very affordable analog chorus pedal
  • Aluminium casing
  • Compact design
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Prone to rolling over due to its thin design
  • Mediocre reliability of true bypass

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

Behringer makes all kinds of top quality guitar tech, ranging from electric guitars and basses to all kinds of pedals. We’re presenting to you their UC200 Ultra Chorus pedal – a highly versatile pedal that comes outfitted with four control knobs (level, tone, rate, and depth), and an LED indicator. If you happen to like it as much as we did, we’re also recommending that you try out the improved (a bit more expensive) version which comes outfitted with a delay effect as well.

Versatility and complexity:

Behringer’s Ultra Chorus UC200 features the most basic control knobs – the Level, Tone, Rate, and Depth. Setting the controls is pretty easy, and the pedal itself is pretty responsive, so you’ll notice the change in tone pretty much immediately. It runs on plain 9V batteries (or PCU-SB Behringer supply, but it’s sold separately). In essence, the UC200 is a moderately versatile pedal that packs quite a lot of sound customization potential.

Price:

Surprisingly enough, the UC200 is even more affordable than Donner’s Tutti Love, although both of these pedals are in the same price point category. This is a very valuable pedal that you will be satisfied with for years to come should you opt for it.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

People who are low on budget should consider the UC200 – it’s safe to say that anyone could save up that much cash in a week or so. If you’re new to chorus pedals, this will be a perfect opportunity for you to see how it works firsthand.

What we liked about this pedal:

The low price and easiness of use are the top two things we liked about Behringer’s Ultra Chorus UC200. Every little detail regarding the controls is easily noticeable and clearly visible, and the pedal is quite responsive, making it a perfect pedal for beginners.

What we thought could be improved:

The bypass leaves a lot to be desired – it does work, but it also produces a rather peculiar sound when it’s turned off. Anyhow, cheap and budget effect pedals are pretty much “famous” for low reliability of their bypass features.

Pros:

  • Superbly inexpensive
  • Exceptionally easy to use
  • High-quality thick chorus
  • Dedicated control knobs
  • check-circle
    LED indicator

Cons:

  • The bypass feature is plainly bad

First impressions, general overview of key specs and features:

The last chorus pedal in our review is Ammoon’s Nano Series chorus pedal. You’d be surprised at how versatile it is, and even though it’s in the lowest bracket of the “budget” price point category, it promises quite a lot in terms of performance and value. This pedal packs three control knobs (Level, depth, and rate), and a neat little switch that allows you to “deepen” your preset chorus.

Versatility and complexity:

The only reason why we dub Ammoon’s Nano Series chorus pedal as versatile is because of the “deep/normal” switch. Whatever chorus you get by tweaking the knobs you can deepen or normalize, extending the range of tones you could get from this pedal. That, however, makes it just a bit harder to use than most cheap pedals, but it’s still pretty straightforward.

Price:

Ammoon’s Nano Series chorus pedal belongs to the same price point category, and comes at nearly the same price as Behringer’s UC200. This is a very, very cheap pedal that is solidly built, so know that we don’t attribute the term “cheap” to its durability.

Who’s this chorus pedal ideal for:

Intermediate level guitar players who don’t wish to pay very much for an effect pedal will be more than happy to own Ammoon’s Nano Series chorus pedal. This is simply the perfect pedal for skilled players who don’t mind a little buzz here and there.

What we liked about this pedal:

True bypass, huge range of chorus tones, two effective modes of operation, full-analog design – these are all the things that amazed us. This pedal is also petite in size, making it very compact, but its aluminium casing doesn’t lag behind its other qualities.

What we thought could be improved:

Truth be told, there’s just one thing that bothered us while we tested out Ammoon’s Nano Series chorus pedal – the “deep / normal” switch produces an annoying popping sound when it’s turned on (via amp).

Pros:

  • Excellent versatility and durability
  • Two chorus modes
  • Huge sound customization potential
  • Great value for the buck
  • check-circle
    Completely inexpensive

Cons:

  • Popping sound occurs when the switch is flipped

Chorus Pedal Buying Guide

There’s plenty of things we wish to discuss with you – choosing the best chorus pedal from the plethora of models found on market can be a very tricky task. We’ll discuss some of the most important aspects of a quality chorus pedal and answer some of the most frequently asked questions regarding the matter along the way.

Bass or a guitar chorus pedal?

In case you didn’t know, some chorus pedals are meant to be used by guitarists and others by bass players. Even though this is pretty self-explanatory, knowing the difference will save you both the cash and the trouble. For further reference, browse through our guides of best guitar and bass chorus pedals in the sections below.

Skill level

How good you play the guitar is one thing, but how well do you fare when tech talk is in question? Professional musicians and veterans have “better” ears for details and know a great deal about what they want and how they want it – that’s the reason why top brands are making boutique level chorus pedals (MXR, Boss, and others) which cost well above $100.

Simply put, if your knowledge regarding your guitar tech isn’t well polished, you might not be able to utilize your chosen chorus pedal in full.

For example, let’s take Zoom’s Multistomp – this pedal features 86 effects onboard, some of which are chorus modes, others are delays, reverbs, flangers, and other effects. Most beginners, even some intermediate-level guitarists would be puzzled at the sheer number of features this pedal has, not to mention tweaking the knobs and adjusting the controls.

On the other hand, there are numerous chorus pedals that are best suited for beginners and casual guitar players – Donner’s Tutti Love, for example, doesn’t feature too much buttons and knobs, and it’s decently responsive.

Easy to use versus sound quality

This question is pretty famous among guitar and bass players nowadays. Namely, some people use numerous pedals and don’t want to spend countless hours adjusting each and every one, while others (perfectionists) prefer it the other way around. So, is it better to get an easy to use chorus pedal, or the one that simply sounds good?

That, of course, depends on what you intend to do with your chorus. Some guitarists rely on chorus effects heavily, and even go as far as to fill the gaps it makes with vibrato and delay effects. If you’re a guitarist that plays complex, technically demanding music, the answer to our question is not that easy.

On one hand, an easy to use pedal is more reliable – it allows you to get what you want pronto, leaving you with more time to polish your skills and pay attention to more important details. On the other hand, good sounding chorus pedals, even though they’re harder to use will give you more options to play around with.

The situation with beginner guitarists is pretty much one-sided – there’s no need to rush your purchase of a good sounding chorus pedal (although we did include several sweet models in our “cheap chorus pedals” section), as you’ll have no use of it if you don’t know how to properly adjust the controls.

Design & durability

Even though the design of your pedal isn’t as important as its sound and easiness of use, it’s still something that you should pay close attention to when searching for the best model. Namely, there are bulky pedals, thin ones, the ones best suited for heavily packed rigs, and the ones that simply won’t even fit in one. It’s not a complex issue, we’re simply here to remind you of it.

Durability, on the other hand, is very important. Namely, there’s a very good reason why some musicians refer to effect pedals as “stomp boxes” (not to be confused with an instrument with the same name). Basically, you will be “stomping” your pedal, and there’s no better way to put it out of commission than that.

Alas, it’s a necessary evil, which leads us to conclusion that durable pedals are the only ones which are valuable. Most high-quality chorus pedals are made of solid metal or aluminium materials, so feel free to skip over anything that’s flimsier than that.

Basic control knobs/settings

Generally, each pedal comes with a different set of control knobs – there are plain models which feature only one (for instance, the Neo Clone has only one knob and only one switch), but there are also models which come with five or more control knobs.

Some of the most widely used controls are:

  • Low – governs the low frequencies
  • High – same as “low”, only with high frequencies
  • Level – sometimes called “volume”, governs the overall volume of your chorus effect (not your overall sound volume)
  • Rate – governs the speed of your chorus effect
  • Depth – governs the intensity of your chorus effect
  • Footswitch/Bypass – turns the bypass on or off (bypass overrides other signals from your pedal chain)

Conclusion

This concludes our review of the best chorus pedal models you could find on the market of today. If you haven’t, make sure to check out our comprehensive buying guide at the beginning – there are details that will help you better understand the “shop talk”, as well as valuable information which aim to equip you with the know-how required to pick the best pedal for the cash.

Each pedal we are recommending to you comes from a reputable brand and was rigorously tested for performance and flaws – that being said, you can rest assured that whichever model you pick, you will be happy, if not thrilled or more. We wish you luck in finding the best chorus pedal!

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